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Le droit de l'Océan Indien
en un clic!

Pays de l'océan Indien

Shivani GEORGIJEVIC

MAURITIUS (REPUBLIC OF)

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General Information

1The Republic of Mauritius [hereafter ‘Mauritius’] is a group of islands in the South West of the Indian Ocean, consisting of the main island of Mauritius, Rodrigues and several outer islands located at distances greater than 350 km from the main island. Mauritius has been successively under Dutch, French and British administration. It became independent of Britain on 12th March 1968 and acceded to the status of Republic within the Commonwealth on 12th March 1992 (Mauritius in Figures 2015, Statistics Mauritius, http://statsmauritius.govmu.org/English/Publications/Pages/Mauritius-in-Figures.aspx).  

2In Mauritius, English is the official language. French and Creole are commonly used. Hindi and Bhojpuri are also spoken.

3The population is comprised of 1, 262, 862 inhabitants.The Republic of Mauritius is a secular state. However, the population is constituted of several religions thus making the state a multi-cultural one.

Year

Total Population

Island of Mauritius

Island of Rodrigues

Outer Islands (such as Agalega and St Brandon)

1972

850 968

826 199

24 769

-

Hindu Population

428 345

428 167

178

-

Muslim Population

137 171

137 081

90

-

Sino-Mauritian Population

24 373

24 084

289

-

General Population

261 079

236 867

24 212

-

-

31 December 2015

1 262 862

1 220 530

42 058

274

Table 1 : Population (No data on community was collected in 1983, 1990, 2000 and 2011 Censuses)

4Source: http://statsmauritius.govmu.org/English/Pages/POPULATION--And-VITAL-STATISTICS.aspx

5During the past thirty years, the Mauritian economy has diversified from a sugar-cane monocrop economy in the 1970's to one based on sugar, manufacturing (mainly textiles and garments) and tourism in the 1980's. Global business (offshore) and Freeport activities have also been growing continuously since the mid-1990s.(Mauritius in Figures 2015, Statistics Mauritius, http://statsmauritius.govmu.org/English/Publications/Pages/Mauritius-in-Figures.aspx)  

Legal System

6During the French colonial period (1715 - 1810), and before the “Code civil” came into force in Mauritius, the inhabitants of the island of French origin were governed by the “Coutume de Paris” and the “Ordonnances de Colbert”, the slaves were governed by the “Code noir” and the other inhabitants had, with few restrictions (donations, wills, liberal professions, etc.), the same rights as the inhabitants of French origin (P. R. DOMINGUE, The Historical Development of the Mixed Legal System of Mauritius during the French and British Colonial Periods, Law, Management and Social Sciences, Research Journal, Volume 4, 2002, p. 63). The French Civil Code of 1804 was promulgated in Mauritius in 1805 and was re-promulgated in 1808. The French Code of Civil Procedure of 1807 was promulgated in Mauritius in 1808 and the French Code of commerce of 1807 was promulgated in 1809 (P. R. DOMINGUE, ibid, p. 64).

7In 1810, the British took over the island. According to article 8 of the Treaty of Capitulation of 1810, confirmed by the Treaty of Paris of 1814, the inhabitants of Mauritius were authorized to preserve their religion, laws and customs. It is important to note that the French Penal Code of 1810 was not promulgated in Mauritius during the French colonial rule. Rather, it was promulgated in 1838 (Ordinance n° 6/1838) under the British colonial rule with article 8 of the Treaty of Capitulation (P. R. DOMINGUE, ibid, pp. 65-66). However, a few decades after the British took possession of the island, the courts’ structure started to change. In 1836, the Judges of the Court of Appeal were vested with the power to make rules of the Court for the proper administration of justice, and Rules of British inspiration were promulgated in 1837 (P. R. DOMINGUE, ibid, pp. 66-67).

8By Ordinance n° 2 of 1850, the Supreme Court of Mauritius was established and the creation of district courts was allowed. The Supreme Court replaced the “Cour d’Appel” and the “Tribunal de Première Instance”. Furthermore, the Supreme Court was vested with the same powers, authority and jurisdiction as its English counterpart at that time (P. R. DOMINGUE, ibid, p. 67). The Mauritian Supreme Court, thus, has adhered to the doctrines of binding precedent and stare decisis, in spite of article 5 of the Mauritian Civil Code. In 1852 and 1853, a Criminal Procedure Ordinance of British inspiration was adopted in Mauritius. In 1881, the Evidence Ordinance was promulgated, and according to its section 15, the British law of evidence for the time being shall prevail (P. R. DOMINGUE, ibid, p. 69). During the British colonial period, many provisions of the French “Code de commerce” were repealed and replaced by legislation of British origin (P. R. DOMINGUE, ibid, pp. 69 s.).  

9As a result of its historical background, the Mauritian legal system is a mixed legal system where both the French and English colonial powers left their print (http://www.govmu.org/English/ExploreMauritius/Pages/History.aspx). Indeed, some parts of Mauritian legal system are inspired by French Law and the other parts are of British origin. The substantive law in Mauritius is often derived from the French Law (“Code civil français”, “Code penal français” of 1810 and “Code de commerce français”). However, the Public Law which is part of Mauritian substantive law is of British inspiration. The Mauritian Constitution of 1968 confirms this assertion. The laws on trade, commerce, shipping, banking, companies, etc. are also of British and Commonwealth tradition (see e. g.: Banking Act of 2004, Companies Act of 2001, and Merchant Shipping Act of 2007). The procedural law in Mauritius and the law of evidence mainly stem from English Law. This is the consequence of the fact that the courts structure in Mauritius is of Common Law tradition (see: the Courts Act 1945) (P. R. DOMINGUE, ibid, p. 62).

10It is to be noted that British Common Law is in some areas such as contempt of court, judicial review and evidence, the direct source of Mauritian Law. Some written laws, such as the Courts Act of 1945, refer to the Common Law (section 187 on evidence of husband and wife and section 188 A on admissibility of sound recording). Moreover, according to section 16 of the abovementioned Act, the Supreme Court of Mauritius is a Court of Equity, vested with the power to administer justice in all cases where no legal remedy is provided by any other law.

11Therefore, the laws in the Mauritian legal system are made up of:

  1. codified laws, written in French or English, amended as and when needed for the Mauritian context, and

  2. common Law principles and Equity.

12Moreover, the doctrines of binding precedent and stare decisis are applicable in Mauritius. Thus, a decision of a superior court (Supreme Court) will be binding for the future on an inferior court and sometimes will be binding on the court which gave the decision (P. R. DOMINGUE, Introduction to Law and Legal Methods, Unit 2, p. 9). The Mauritian lawyer has to search and find the essential part of the decision containing the answer of a court to the legal issue raised by litigators and which is called the ratio decidendi. This essential part of the decision constitutes the binding legal precedent.

13It is important to underline the fact that Mauritian Law as a mixed legal system is an autonomous legal system, even though it was and is currently influenced by French Law, English Law and the laws of some Commonwealth countries. The decisions of English courts, French Courts and the courts of other Common Law jurisdictions are taken into account by our courts, but those decisions are not formal sources of Mauritian law. Mauritian courts will often quote decisions of English, French and other courts, where appropriate, in order to make as strong as possible their legal reasoning, and especially when Mauritian legislation has been borrowed from English or French legislation. However, there is no legal obligation imposed upon Mauritian courts to follow the decisions of French or English Courts. (see e. g. Mangroo v. Dahal (1937) MR 43).

14An illustration of the originality of the Mauritius legal system is the Law of Trusts (‘la fiducie’). At its origin, the trust from the perspective of the English legal system can be said to have developed from Equity to create an equitable obligation where the common law at that time did not recognise any legal relationship, namely between who is known today as the trustee and the beneficiary. See Austin v. Bailey 1962 MR 113 in respect to the validity of a trust validly created in England and its effect in Mauritian law prior to specific legislative intervention by the Mauritian legislator. Today, the Trusts Act 2001 in Mauritius defines the trust as follows:

15(1) For the purposes of this Act, a trust exists where a person (known as a "trustee") holds or has vested in him, or is deemed to hold or have vested in him, property of which he is not the owner in his own right, with a fiduciary obligation to hold, use, deal or dispose of it -

16 (a) for the benefit of any person (a "beneficiary"), whether or not yet ascertained or in existence;

17 (b) for any purpose, including a charitable purpose, which is not for the benefit only of the trustee; or

18 (c) for such benefit as is mentioned in paragraph (a) and also for any such purpose as is mentioned in paragraph (b).

19(Section 3(1) of the Trusts Act 2001)

20Consequently, the Mauritian Civil Code recognises the trust / ‘la fiducie’ where article 1100-1 provides the following whereby a ‘patrimoine d’affectation sans titulaire’ is recognised:

211100-1 Est appelée fiducie - ou trust - l' ensemble de droits et d' obligations dont fait l'objet un patrimoine (le "bien fiduciaire") qui est affecté dans l'intérêt des bénéficiaires ou dans un but determiné, et qu'une personne (le "fiduciaire") s' oblige à détenir, gérer et administrer suivant cette affectation.

22 […]

231100-2 Le bien fiduciaire formé de biens et de droits transférés en fiducie, constitue un patrimoine d'affectation autonome et distinct de celui du constituant, du fiduciaire ou du bénéficiaire, sur lequel aucun d' entre eux n'a de droit réel.

Institutions politiques

24The State of Mauritius is a Republic and is defined in section 1 of the Constitution as a sovereign democratic State”.

25The Constitution of Mauritius of 1968 provides for a number of institutions namely the executive power, the legislative power and the judicial power.

Executive Power

26The executive power resides in the Government of Mauritius which consists of a Prime Minister and a Deputy Prime Minister appointed by the President (section 59 (1) of the Constitution). The Prime Minister is the Head of Government There is also an Attorney General (who does not have to be a member of the Assembly), and there will be such other Ministers of the Government as may be prescribed by Parliament or, established by the President. The number of offices of Minister, other than the Prime Minister, shall not be more than 24 (section 59 (2)).

27The President has the power to remove the Prime Minister from office, if there is a resolution of no confidence in the Government passed by the Assembly and the Prime Minister does not within 3 days resign from his office (section 60 (1)). In that case, the office of the Ministers will expire (section 60 (4)).

28A Minister of the Government may be removed when the President, upon advice of the Prime Minister, decides so (section 60 (4).

29The Cabinet consists of the Prime Minister and the other Ministers (section 61 (1)) and its main function shall be to advise the President; the Cabinet shall be collectively responsible to the Assembly for any advice given to the President and for all things done by or under the authority of any Minister (section 61 (2)).

30The President of Mauritius, upon advice of the Prime Minister, may, by directions in writing, assign to the Prime Minister or any other Minister responsibility for the conduct of any business of the Government (section 62).

31When the President so requests, the Prime Minister shall submit for the consideration of the Cabinet any matter on which a policy decision has been taken by a Minister but which has not been considered by the Cabinet (section 64 (3).

32It is important to underline the fact that when the President dissolves Parliament otherwise than under the proviso to section 57 of the Constitution, the Prime Minister, may by motion, request the Supreme Court to enquire into the decision (section 64 (5) (b)).

33The Prime Minister shall keep the President fully informed concerning the general conduct of the Government of Mauritius and shall furnish the President with all appropriate information (section 65).

34When a Minister has been charged with responsibility for the administration of any department of Government, he shall exercise general direction and control over that department (section 68).

Legislative Power

35In Mauritius, the legislative power is held by Parliament. The Parliament of Mauritius consists of the President and a National Assembly (section 31 (1)). The Assembly consists of members who are individuals elected through the general elections (section 32 (2)).

36The Supreme Court shall have jurisdiction to hear and determine the questionwhether any person has been validly elected as a member of the Assembly (section 37 (1)).The application to the Court may be made by any person entitled to vote in the election towhich the application relates or by any person who was a candidate at that electionor by the Attorney-General (section 37 (2)).

37Parliament may make laws for the peace, order and good government of Mauritius (section 45).

Judicial Power

38The judicial power is maintained by a system of courts where the highest court is the Supreme Court which acts as a court of first instance as well as an appellate court.

39Indeed, the Supreme Court of Mauritius has unlimited jurisdictionto hear and determine any civil or criminal proceedings under any law other than adisciplinary law (section 76 (1) of the Constitution). In order to ensure the independence of the Judiciary, the Constitution provides that the office of a judge shall not be abolished while any person is holding that office unless he consents to its abolition (section 76 (2)). A Judge of the Supreme Court may be removed from office only for inability to perform the functions of his office (e. g. infirmity of body or mind) or for misbehaviour (section 78 (2)). He will be removed by the President upon advice of the Judicial Committee (section 78 (3)).

40There shall be a Court of Civil Appeal and a Court of Criminal Appeal for Mauritius, each of which shall be a division of the Supreme Court (section 80 (1) of the Constitution). The Judges of the Court of Civil Appeal and the Court of Criminal Appeal are the judges of the Supreme Court (section 80 (3)).

41It also fulfils the role of being the guardian of the Constitution and hence it is vested with the power to look into constitutional matters. According to section 2 of Mauritian Constitution, the Constitution is the supreme law of Mauritius, and if any other law is inconsistent withthe Constitution, that other law shall, to the extent of the inconsistency, be declared void by the Supreme Court (see also section 83 and 84 of the Constitution).

42Further appeal is possible to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council. Under section 81 (1) of the Mauritian Constitution, an appeal shall be automatically possible against the decisions of the Court of Appeal or the Supreme Court to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council (possible since Mauritius became a British colony in 1810) when there are final decisions, in any civil or criminal proceedings, on questions as to the interpretation of this Constitution; where the matter in dispute on the appeal to the Judicial Committee is of the value of 10,000 rupees or upwards or where the appeal involves, directly or indirectly, a claim to or a question respecting property or a right of the value of 1,000 rupees or upwards; in such other cases as may be prescribed by Parliament, provided that there is no other judicial remedy.

43The leave (permission) of the Court of Appeal or of the Supreme Court to appeal to the Privy Council is necessary if the Court is of opinion that the question involved in the appeal is one of great general or public importance; in such other cases as may be prescribed by Parliament (section 80 (2)).

44Finally, the Judicial Committee has its own right to grant special leave to appeal from the decision of any court in any civil or criminal matter if it thinks that it is appropriate (section 81 (5)).

Political Regime

45Mauritius is a parliamentary democracy.

46The political organisation of the country is such that the President is the Head of State as well as the Commander-in-Chief of the Republic of Mauritius. (Section 28(1)(a) of the Constitution)

47His role is to ensure that:

48(i) the institutions of democracy and the rule of law are protected;

49(ii) the fundamental rights of all are respected; and

50(iii) the unity of the diverse Mauritian nation is maintained and strengthened.

51The President is elected by the Assembly on a motion made by the Prime Minister and supported by the votes of a majority of all the members of the Assembly. (Section 28 (2) of the Constitution).

52In the exercise of his functions under the Constitution or any other law, the President shall, generally, act in accordance with the advice of the Cabinet or of a Minister acting under the general authority of the Cabinet (section 64 (1)).

53It has to be reminded that the President has the power to remove the Prime Minister from office, if there is a resolution of no confidence in the Government passed by the Assembly and the Prime Minister does not within 3 days resign from his office (section 60 (1)). The Cabinet of Ministers shall be collectively responsible to the Assembly for any advice given to the President and for all things done by or under the authority of any Minister (section 61 (2)).

54Additionally, according to section 57 of the Constitution, the President, upon advice of the Prime Minister, may atany time dissolve Parliament where the Assembly passes a resolution that it has no confidence in the Government and the Prime Minister does not within 3 days either resign from his office or advise the President to dissolve Parliament; where the office of Prime Minister is vacant and the President considers there is no prospect of his being able within a reasonable time to appoint to that office a person who can command the support of a majority of the members of the Assembly.

Electoral System

55In Mauritius, the members of the National Assembly are elected through general elections.

56The present National Assembly comprises 62 elected members (the 20 constituencies of Mauritius returning 3 members each whilst Rodrigues, the 21st constituency, returns 2 members). Furthermore, 8 additional seats are allocated to non-elected party candidates in order to ensure a fair and adequate representation of each community and party in the Assembly.

57The qualifications for the membership to the Assembly are laid down in section 33 of the Constitution. According to the Constitution, there exist the Electoral Boundaries Commission and the Electoral Supervisory Commission (section 38). The Electoral Boundaries Commission shall make recommendations for any alterations to the boundaries of the constituencies as appear to the Commission to be required so that the number of inhabitants of each constituency is as nearly equal as is reasonably possible. The Electoral Supervisory Commission shall have general responsibility for and shall supervise the registration of electors for the election of members of the Assembly and the conduct of elections of such members and the Commission shall have such powers and other functions relating to such registration and such elections as may be prescribed. Furthermore, the office of the electoral commissioner is provided for by the Constitution under section 40 of the Constitution. The Electoral Commissioner shall have such powers and other functions relating to such registration and elections as may be prescribed, and he shall keep the Electoral Supervisory Commission fully informed concerning the exercise of his functions and shall have the right to attend meetings of the Commission and to refer to the Commission for their advice or decision any question relating to his functions.

58The Representation of the People Act, the Rodrigues Regional Assembly Act, the Local Government Act and Regulations governing the National Assembly, Rodrigues Regional Assembly, Local Government Council Elections are, inter alia, the principal instruments governing the organisation and conduct of elections

59Section 42 of the Constitution also prescribes the qualifications of electors and section 44 regulates the right to vote.

60Rodrigues Regional Assembly

61The Rodrigues Regional Assembly has been created following an amendment made to the Constitution where Chapter VIA has been added to provide for its creation and functioning.

62The Rodrigues Regional Assembly is the Regional Parliament of the Island of Rodrigues which forms part of the Republic of Mauritius. The Regional Assembly was established following the passing at the National Assembly of Mauritius of the Rodrigues Regional Assembly Act 2001(RRA Act 2001) ​which granted the island autonomy. The RRA Act 2001 (Section 3(2)) sets the Regional Assembly as a body corporate exercising its function on behalf of the government of Mauritius.​ (http://assembly.rra.govmu.org/English/Pages/Intro/The-Parliament.aspx)

Protection of Fundamental Rights and Freedoms

63Mauritius has ratified a number of human rights conventions at the United Nations level as well as the African Union’s level. Some of these rights have been incorporated in the domestic legal system namely in the Constitution and a number of statutory law.

64Chapter II of the Constitution (sections 3 to 16) provides for a number of human rights (mainly civil and political rights). According to section 3, the Chapter aims at having effect “for the purpose of affording protection to those rights and freedoms subject to such limitations of that protection as are contained in those provisions, being limitations designed to ensure that the enjoyment of those rights and freedoms by any individual does not prejudice the rights and freedoms of others or the public interest”. The following rights are protected in Chapter II:

  • Protection of right to life

  • Protection of right to personal liberty

  • Protection from slavery and forced labour

  • Protection from inhuman treatment

  • Protection from deprivation of property

  • Protection for privacy of home and other property

  • Provisions to secure protection of law

  • Protection of freedom of conscience

  • Protection of freedom of expression

  • Protection of freedom of assembly and association

  • Protection of freedom to establish schools

  • Protection of freedom of movement

  • Protection from discrimination

65Section 17 ensures that the enforcement of those rights is made possible at the level of the Supreme Court when there is an allegation that any of the rights in sections 3 to 16 “has been, is being or is likely to be contravened in relation to him”. According to the Supreme Court (Constitutional Relief) Rules 2000, it is necessary to state with precision the provision of the Constitution breached or likely to be breached. See Thakoree v Public Service Commission [2011 SCJ 388].

66However, the Supreme Court shall not exercise its powers under this subsection if it is satisfied that adequate means of redress for the contravention alleged are or have been available to the person concerned under any other law (Section 17(2)). See Poongavanam v Director of Public Prosecutions [1993 MR 298], Vert v District Magistrate of Plaines Wilhems & Ors [1993 MR 28],Bardwaz Jekarahjee v The State of Mauritius [2010 SCJ 60] and Marie & ors v The State of Mauritius [2011 SCJ 269].

67From the Government’s perspective, the mandate in relation to Human rights is within the Human Rights Unit of the Prime Minister’s Office.

68Furthermore, there are a number of institutions created as independent bodies to look into human rights issues namely the National Human Rights Commission, the Ombudsman Office, the Ombudsperson for Children’s Office, and the Equal Opportunities Commission.

Participation in International and Regional organisations

69Mauritius is a member of the following institutions:

70African Union (AU): since August 1968

71Hague Conference on Private International Law :since 19 january 2011

72International Organisation of la Francophonie: since 1970

73Southern African Development Community (SADC): since 28 August 1995

74United Nations (UN): since 24 April 1968

75Adherence to international and regional judicial institutions:

76Statute of the International Criminal Court: instrument of ratification deposited on 5 March 2002

77Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights on the Establishment of the African Court on Human and Peoples' Rights: ratified on 3 March 2003

Sources of Law

78In Mauritius, there are several formal sources of law.

79The Constitution of 1968 provides that it is the Supreme law of Mauritius, and if any other law is inconsistent withthe Constitution, that other law shall, to the extent of the inconsistency, be declared void (section 2). This supreme law regulates several important issues and themes, such as the protection of fundamental rights and freedoms of the individual, citizenship, the office of the President and the Vice-President of Mauritius, Parliament, Legislation and Legislative process, the Executive, the Judicature, etc.

80There are also written laws in Mauritius which are either in English or in French. In the field of civil and private law, the laws are currently written in French (“Code civil”, “Code de commerce” and “Code de procédure civile”). The Penal Code (Criminal Code Act of 1838) is written both in French and in English. There are also many other written laws in English (e. g. Employment Relations Act of 2008, Employment Rights Act of 2008, Notaries Act of 2008, Sale of Immovable Property Act of 1864, etc.).

81Currently, written laws are adopted in Mauritius through Acts of Parliament (known as statutory law or primary legislation) and regulations (secondary legislation).

82Legislative Process for an Act of Parliament

83Before an Act of Parliament comes into force, there has to be a Bill passed by the National Assembly and assented to by the President of Mauritius (section 46 (1) of the Constitution).

84There are several stages that every Bill must go through before it is adopted by the National Assembly.

  • the First Reading (purely formal, no debate at this stage);

  • the Second Reading (the need of a motion; a general debate on the philosophy and the broad principals of the Bill; no possibility to amend the Bill);

  • the Committee Stage (the examination of the Bill clause by clause, the consideration proposed amendments; the possibility of reporting and debating in the Assembly);

  • the Third Reading (the review of the Bill in its final form; no possibility to submit further amendments).

85Regarding Ordinary Bills, a simple majority of Members of Parliament present and voting at the end of the Second Reading is required to pass them (section 53 (1) of the Constitution). For the Bills amending the Constitution, a qualified majority is required (3/4 of all the Members of the Assembly, sometimes 2/3).

86The Bill adopted in the National Assembly has to be assented to by the President (sect. 46 (1)). In some cases the President can withhold his assent. However, when the Bill is reconsidered by the Assembly and passed with or without amendment, the President shall give his assent.

87Secondary Legislation

88Regulations, as a category of written laws, and a source of law, play an important role in Mauritius. There are two types of secondary legislation:

  1. Rules and Regulations which derive their validity from Acts of Parliament (e. g. section 360 of the Companies Act of 2001 provides that the Minister may make such regulations as he thinks fit for the purposes of this Act), and

  2. laws which derive their validity directly from the Constitution (sections 118 and 120 of the Constitution).

89Case-law as a source of lawconsists of the decisions of the Mauritian Supreme court which are binding for the future on inferior courts (district courts and Intermediate Court) (see : Ardé v. Baissac (1864) MR 83). The decisions of the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council are binding on the Supreme Court of Mauritius to the extent that they are applicable to Mauritius (see: Société United Docks v. Government of Mauritius (1981) MR 500 : "decisions of the Privy Council are binding upon us when they apply Mauritian law"). Judicial precedents are a formal source of law in Mauritius due to section 2 of the Ordinance n° 2 of 1850, which established the Supreme Court, vesting it with the same powers, authority, and jurisdiction that are possessed and exercised by Her Majesty's Court of Queen's Bench in England. Moreover, section 4 of that Ordinance, was to the effect that the Supreme Court and the judges thereof shall sit, and proceed to and conduct, and carry on, business in the same manner as the Court of Queen's Bench and the judges thereof (see also : DPP v. Mootoocarpen 1988).

90The decisions of French courts (“Cour de cassation” in particular) and English courts (High Court of Justice in particular – except in those areas where Common Law or Equitable rules have been made applicable in Mauritius by the Mauritian Parliament) are not formal sources of Mauritian Law (Mangroo v. Dahal 1937). They can constitute persuasive authority only (see : P.-R. DOMINGUE, Finding out the legal rule applicable to a given situation, Introduction to Law and Legal Methods, Unit 2, pp. 12-13).

91Customs (see: P.-R. DOMINGUE, Finding out the legal rule applicable to a given situation, Introduction to Law and Legal Methods, Unit 2, pp. 13-16)

92The Common Law of England is a direct source of Mauritian Law in some cases such as contempt of court, judicial review and evidence (see : P.-R. DOMINGUE, Finding out the legal rule applicable to a given situation, Introduction to Law and Legal Methods, Unit 2, pp. 10-11). Moreover, under section 16 of the Courts Act of 1945, the Supreme Court of Mauritius is a Court of Equity, vested with the power to administer justice in all cases where no legal remedy is provided by any other law.

Conventions internationales et accords internationaux

International Conventions

93International conventions are not directly applicable in Mauritius after their ratification. They have to be incorporated in Mauritian law through an Act of Parliament incorporating part or the whole of the convention (e. g. The Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards Act 2001). This is due to the sovereignty of Parliament resulting in Mauritius being a dualist state. The Supreme Court has confirmed this in a number of cases, for e.g. in Pierce v Pierce [1998 SCJ 397] where the Court provided as follows: “Though Mauritius has acceded to that Convention [Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction], the provisions of the whole or part of that Convention have not been implemented in our national laws, unlike, for example, the Convention Abolishing the Requirements of Legalisation for Foreign Public Documents Act which gave the force of law in Mauritius to the Convention on that matter signed at the Hague on 5 October1961and published in [GN No. 14 of 1966]. Consequently, […], suffice it to say that that Convention is not part of our law and that this Court is not bound to give effect to its provisions”.

94In Michael Rex Jordan v Marie Martine Jordan [2000 SCJ 057] at page 18, the court underlined the following: “Whilst the Constitution proclaims that Mauritius shall be a sovereign democratic State, it also establishes the principle of separation of powers. Each of the three arms of Government has a distinct and different role to play and each should confine itself to its specific domain. If our domestic legislation has not been brought into line with the Hague Convention for Mauritius to comply with its international obligations, the Judiciary can only make the relevant observations.”

95In respect to interpretation of international law instruments the Supreme Court confirmed that domestic legislation should, if possible, be construed so as to conform to international instruments to which the State is a party. See Matadeen & Anor v. Pointu & Ors (Privy Council Appeal no. 14 of 1997 at page 17).

Justice and Jurisdictions

96The highest purely Mauritian judicial authority is the Supreme Court of Mauritius which can act as a court of first instance as well as an appellate court. As a court of first instance, the Supreme Court of Mauritius has unlimited jurisdictionto hear and determine any civil or criminal proceedings under any law other than adisciplinary law. In order to ensure the control of the decisions made by the Supreme Court as the court of first instance, there is a Court of Civil Appeal and a Court of Criminal Appeal for Mauritius, each of which is a division of the Supreme Court. Moreover, the Supreme Court of Mauritius has jurisdiction to hear and determine the appeals against the decisions of the Intermediate Court and district courts. In Mauritius, there are no specialized administrative courts. The mechanism of judicial review is used before the Supreme Court of Mauritius. However, there is the Bankruptcy Division of the Supreme Court having jurisdiction to deal with all matters of bankruptcy, insolvency or the winding up of companies (section 62 (1) of the Courts Act of 1945).

97The Supreme Court of Mauritius also has jurisdiction in respect to constitutional issues (sections 83 and 84 of the Constitution).

98The official language in the Supreme Court of Mauritius is English (section 14 (1)). However, where a person appearing before the Court satisfies the Court that he does not possess a competent knowledge of the English language, he may give his evidence or make any statement in the language with which he is best acquainted (section 14 (2)) (eg. French or Creole).

99In civil cases, every proceeding in the Supreme Court, save for those provided by other sections of the Courts Act, will be heard and disposed of by a single judge (section 35). However, the Chief Justice may, either proprio motu or on application in writing made to him by any party to a case stating the reasons for such application, direct that any case shall be heard by 2 or more judges, having regard to the magnitude of the interests at-stake or the importance or intricacy of the questions of fact or law involved (section 36). In criminal cases, when the law requires to take the case before the full court, 3 or 5 judges shall hear the case (section 39). It is important to note that one single sitting can be held for the dispatch, at the same time, of criminal business and civil business (section 40). Save as otherwise expressly provided in any other enactment, appeals to the Supreme Court shall be heard before at least 2 judges (section 70).

100By virtue of the Supreme Court (Mediation) Rules 2010, mediation has been made possible in the judicial process within the Supreme Court. According to section 2(1), the “rules shall apply to such civil suit, action, cause or matter which has been brought and is pending before the Supreme Court as the Chief Justice may deem appropriate to refer for mediation before a Judge of the Supreme Court”. Furthermore, paragraph 2 provides that “[w]ithout prejudice to the generality of paragraph (1), any party to a civil suit, action, cause or matter which has been brought and is pending before the Supreme Court may apply to the Chief Justice for same to be referred for mediation”. The Rules also provide for the ‘Mediation Judge’ who has been given powers to act as a mediator.  

101In Mauritius there is also the Intermediate Court which is the judicial power inferior to the Supreme Court. The Intermediate Court has civil jurisdiction in all civil cases where the sum or matter in dispute does not exceed the prescribed amount, exclusive of interest and costs (section 104). In general, every case before the Intermediate Court shall take place before one Magistrate (section 85 (1). However, the President of the Intermediate Court may, either proprio motu or on application in writing made to him by any party to a case stating the reasons for such application, direct that any case shall be heard by 2 or more Magistrates, having regard to the magnitude of the interests at stake or the importance or intricacy of the questions of fact or law involved (section 85 (2)).

102According to section 104 A of the Courts Act, a District Court shall have jurisdiction in any civil action, where the sum claimed or matter in dispute does not exceed 25,000 rupees.

103There also exists a Court of Rodrigues where the Magistrate for Rodrigues has within Rodrigues the same powers and jurisdiction as are conferred on every District Magistrate in Mauritius. He has also jurisdiction to hear and dispose of any case referred to in section 112 (d) and (f) of the Courts Act which in Mauritius, would upon a reference by the Director of Public Prosecution, be cognizable by the Intermediate Court.

104The language to be used in the Intermediate Court or in any District Court shall be English, but any person may address the court in French (section 131 (1)).

105Furthermore, an Industrial Court (section 3 of the Industrial Court Act) whereby it has exclusive civil and criminal jurisdiction to try any matter arising out of the enactments set out in the 1st schedule of the Act or of any regulations made under those enactments (which relate to labour laws). The Industrial Court is composed of two Magistrates who are appointed by the Judicial and Legal Service Commission (section 86 of the Constitution). Any person against whom judgment has been given may appeal subject to the same conditions as appeals from a decision of a District Magistrate (section 11 Industrial Court Act).

106Finally, according to the Mauritian Constitution, there is the possibility to appeal to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council (United Kingdom) against the decisions of the Supreme Court. Under section 81 (1) of Mauritian Constitution, an appeal shall be automatically possible against the decisions of the Court of Appeal or the Supreme Court to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council when there are final decisions, in any civil or criminal proceedings, on questions as to the interpretation of this Constitution; where the matter in dispute on the appeal to the Judicial Committee is of the value of 10,000 rupees or upwards or where the appeal involves, directly or indirectly, a claim to or a question respecting property or a right of the value of 1,000 rupees or upwards; in such other cases as may be prescribed by Parliament, provided (in all cases) that there is no other judicial remedy.

107The leave (permission) of the Court of Appeal or of the Supreme Court to appeal to the Privy Council is necessary if the Court is of opinion that the question involved in the appeal is one of great general or public importance; in such other cases as may be prescribed by Parliament (section 80 (2)).

108Finally, the Judicial Committee has its own right to grant special leave to appeal from the decision of any court in any civil or criminal matter if it thinks that it is appropriate (section 81 (5)).

109Database for all decisions: https://supremecourt.govmu.org/SitePages/HomePage.aspx

Branches of law

110The Law in Mauritius can be categorized into Public Law and Private Law. Public Law is often of British inspiration. Constitutional law is regulated by the Constitution of 1968. Administrative law is mainly regulated by the rules of English Common Law (Judicial Review). However, the substantive criminal law is currently inspired (with few exceptions) by French Law (French Penal Code of 1810). Many other aspects of Mauritian Public Law are regulated by statutory law in English (The Education Act of 1957, Central Water Authority Act of 1971, Waste Water Management Authority Act of 2000, etc.).  

111The Mauritian Civil Law is mainly inspired by French Law. Thus, the Mauritian Civil Code, “Code de Commerce” and Code of Civil Procedure are written in French and influenced by French Law. However, other parts of Private Law are regulated by Acts of Parliament written in English. For example, the labour laws in Mauritius are constituted of the Employment Relations Act 2008 and the Employment Rights Act 2008.

Legislation

112https://supremecourt.govmu.org/SitePages/HomePage.aspx

113Education

114- Section 14 of the Constitution

115- The Education Act of 1957

116- The Education and Training (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act of 2005

117- Early Childhood Care and Educational Authority Act of 2007

118- The Mauritius Institute of Training and Development Act 2009

119- The Education (Private Primary Schools) Regulations 1989

120- The Education (Pre-School Institutions) Regulations 1987

121- Early Childhood Care and Educational Authority (Registration of Pre-Primary Schools) Regulations 2011

122Water

123- The Central Water Authority Act of 1971

124- The Waste Water Management Authority Act of 2000

125- The Ground Water Act of 1969

126- Central Water Authority (Water Supply for Non-Domestic Purposes) Regulations of 2011

127- CentralWater Authority (Water Supply for Domestic Purposes) Regulations of 2011

128- Central Water Authority (Census of Existing Water Rights) Regulations of 1980

129- Central Water Authority (Irrigation) Regulations of 1973

130- Wastewater (Fees) Regulations of 2001

131- Waste Water (Registration of Waste Water Carriers and Disposal of Waste Water) Regulations of 2006

132- Waste Water (Standards for Discharge of Industrial Effluent into a Waste Water System) Regulations of 2004

133- Ground Water Regulations of 2011

134Hydrocarbons

135- The Petroleum Act of 1970

136- Petroleum(Licenceand Lease) Regulations of 1970

137Mines

138-Minerals Act of 1966

139Environment

140- Environment Protection Act of 2002

141- Environment and Land Use Appeal Tribunal Act of 2012

142- EnvironmentProtection (Banning of Plastic Bags) Regulations of 2015

143- Environment Protection (Standards for effluent discharge) Regulations of 2003

144- Environment Protection (Effluent Discharge Permit) Regulations of 2003

145- Environment Protection (Standards for hazardous wastes) Regulations of 2001

146- Environment Protection (Environmental Standards for Noise) Regulations of 1997

147- Environment Protection (Control of Noise) Regulations of 2008

148- Environment Protection (Standards for Air) Regulations of 1998

149Public Institutions

150- Postal Services Act of 2002

151- Public Bodies Appeal Tribunal Act of 2008

152- Public Service Commission Act of 1953

153- Central Electricity Board Act of 1963

154- Public Service Commission (Emoluments of members) Order of 1974

155- Central Electricity Board (Mauritius Broadcasting Corporation-Collectionof LicenseFees) Regulations 1989

156- PostalServices(Appeals) (Rules of Procedure)Regulations of 2004

157Public Finances

158- Finance Act (periodical)

159- Finance and Audit Act of 1973

160- Finance and Audit (RecoveredAssets Fund) Regulations of 2014

161- Finance and Audit(Local DevelopmentFund) Regulations of 2008

162- Finance and Audit (Trust Fund for Excellence in Sports) Regulations of 2002

163- Finance and Audit (PermanentResident Investment Fund) Regulations of2000

164Public Service and Public Servants

165- Public Officers’ Protection Act of 1957

166- Public Officer’s Fees Act of 1948

167- Public Officers’ Pensions (Mauritius) Agreement Act of 1975

168- Public Officers’ Security Act of 1871

169- Public Officers’ Welfare Council Act of 1992

170- Teachers’ Pensions (Reckonable Service) Ordinance of 1954

171- Pensions Act of 1951

172- Police Act of 1975

173Religion and Public Gathering

174- Constitution of 1968 (Chapter 2)

175- Public Gathering Act of 1991

176Droits de l’homme

177- Constitution of 1968 (Chapter 2)

178- Education Act of 1957

179- Public Health Act 1925

180- The Social Aid Act 1983 and Regulations

181- The Protection of Human Rights Act 1998

182- Ombudsperson for Children Act 2003

183- Equal Opportunities Act 2008

184Elections

185Constitution (section 31 onwards)

186The Representation of the People Act

187Rodrigues Regional Assembly Act

188Local Government Act and Regulations

189Media

190Media Trust Act of 1994

191Public markets

192- Public Procurement Act of 2006

193- PublicProcurement (Disqualification) Regulations of 2009

194- Public Procurement(Suspension andDebarment)Regulations of 2008

195- Public Procurement(ElectronicBidding System) Regulations of 2015

196Health

197- Public Health Act 1925

198- Medical Practitioners Act

199- Medical Council Act of 1999

200- Medicinal Tinctures and Drugs Act

201- Mental Health Care Act of 1998

202- Dangerous Drugs Act of 2000

203- Dangerous Chemicals Control Act of 2004

204- Medical Practitioners(Diplomasand Experience) Regulations of 1980

205- MedicalCouncil(Exemption from Examination) Regulations of 2013

206- Medical Council (RecognisedProfessional Body) Regulations of 2008

207- Medical Council (MedicalInstitutions) Regulations of 2004

208- Medical Council (Registration of Registered MedicalPractitioners) Regulations of 2000

209- Mental Health Care (Licensing of Private Mental Health Care Centres)Regulations of 2009

210- Mental Health Care (Accounts Committee) Regulations of 1999

211- Dangerous Drugs (PrescribedForms) Regulations of 2001

212- Dangerous Drugs (Institutions) Regulations of2005

213- DangerousChemicalsControl (Fees) Regulations of 2005

214- Draft Allied Health Professions Council Bill 2016

215- Human Tissue (Removal, Preservation and Transplant) Act

216- Food Act 1998

217- Food Regulations 1999

218- Pharmacy Act 2015

219Tourism

220- Tourism Act of 2004

221- Tourism Authority Act of 2006

222- Tourism Employees Welfare Fund Act of 2002

223- Tourism (Designation of Tourist Sites) Regulations of 2005

224- Tourism (Issue of Licence) Regulations of 2004

225- Tourism Authority (Dolphin and Whale Watching) Regulations of 2012

226- Tourism Authority (Pleasure Craft Licence Fees) of Regulations 2007

227- Tourism Authority (Prohibition of Jet Ski) Regulations of 2016

228Air Transport

229« Code de commerce » (art. 437 foll.)

230Transport maritime

231-« Code de commerce » (art. 257 foll.)

232-Merchant Shipping Act of 2007

233-MerchantShipping (Registration of Ships) Regulations of 2009

234-Merchant Shipping (Fees) Regulations of 2009

235-Merchant Shipping (Distress Signal and Prevention of Collisions) Regulation 2004

236Transport terrestre et fluvial

237« Code de commerce » (art. 99 foll.)

238Urbanisme

239Building Control Act of 2012

240Local Government Act of 2011

Law Practitioners

Magistrates

241In Mauritius, the Supreme Court is constituted of Judges, whether the Supreme Court acts as the court of first instance or an appellate court. Every Judge has criminal, civil and administrative jurisdiction. The Chief Justice of the Supreme Court shall be appointed by the President of Mauritius acting after consultation withthe Prime Minister. The Senior Puisne Judge shall be appointed by the President, acting in accordancewith the advice of the Chief Justice.The Puisne Judges shall be appointed by the President, acting in accordance withthe advice of the Judicial and Legal Service Commission.No person shall be qualified for appointment as a Judge of the Supreme Courtunless he is, and has been for at least 5 years, a barrister entitled to practise beforethe Supreme Court.

242In the Intermediate Court and district courts there are Magistrates having civil and criminal jurisdiction.

243The Director of Public Prosecutions is in charge of prosecuting criminal offences.

Barristers and Sollicitors

244Mauritian barristers are gathered in the Mauritius Bar Association which is committed to serving its members, to constantly protect, promote and enhance the interests of the profession as a whole, enhance diversity and advance the rule of law in Mauritius. Membership to the Bar Association is compulsory for all Barristers (http://www.mauritiusbarassociation.com/index.php/about-us).

245Mauritian solicitors are gathered in the Mauritius Law Society.

246The profession of barristers and solicitors in Mauritius is regulated by the Law Practitioners Act of 1984. According to section 3, no person shall provide legal services unlesshis name has been entered on the Roll as a barrister, an attorney ornotary; andhe is a memberin the case of a barrister, of the Mauritius Bar Association,in the case of an attorney, of the Mauritius Law Society orin the case of a notary, of the Association of Notaries.

Notaries

247Mauritian notaries are authorized to draw up any deed which the parties are required by law, or on their own initiative, to invest with the character of authenticity attaching to the documents of a public authority, to keep any notarial deed drawn up by them or deposited with them in their custody and to deliver a certified copy of a deed drawn up by them. The profession of notaries in Mauritius is regulated by the Notaries Act of 2008. This Act addresses the issues such as exercise of profession, notarial deeds and certified copies, association of notaries, professional conduct, notaries’ fees, etc. The notaries are gathered in the Association of Notaries which is a body corporate and the objects of the Association are to safeguard, maintain and promote the interests of its members,uphold the honour, dignity, reputation and independence of its members,further the interests of its members in connection with the practice of their profession, regulate the profession of a notary and ensure compliance with the Code or the rules ofpractice of the profession, etc.

Bibliography

248In collaboration With Professeur Jonas KNETSCH, université Jean Monnet Saint-Étienne.

Books

  • S. ALLEN, The Chagos Islanders and International Law, Bloomsbury Publishing, 2014, 272 pp.

  • E. BALANCY, The Information, coll. Studies in Criminal Law and Procedure, 1983, 130 pp.

  • E. BALANCY, The Law of Conspiracy in Mauritius, coll. Studies in Criminal Law and Procedure, 1985, 83 pp.

  • E. BALANCY, Basic Criminal Procedure and Evidence for Prosecutors, 1ère éd. 1989, 2e éd. 1992, 50 pp.

  • M. BOGDAN, The Law of Mauritius and Seychelles, Juristförlaget i Lund, 1989, 54 pp.

  • U. BOOLELL, Company Law of Mauritius, Temple Law Books, 1ère éd. 1997, 2e éd. 2012

  • S. BHUCKORY, Local Government in Mauritius. The Local Government Ordinance & Urban Authorities, Neo Press, 1963, 151 pp.

  • S. BHUCKORY, An Outline of Local Government, Association of Urban Authorities, 1970, 125 pp.

  • S. BHUCKORY, Our Constitution, Mauritius Print Co., 1971, 115 pp.

  • S. CADERVALOO, L’affaire Gorah Issac : un procès pour l’histoire, éd. Presses de caractère, 2003, 361 pp.

  • S. B. DOMAH, The Theory and Practice of the Mauritian Law on Swindling, 1ère éd. 1988, 2e éd. 2009, 204 pp.

  • B. DONDERO/J.-B. SEUBE, Manuel de droit bancaire mauricien, Lextenso, 2012, 626 pp.

  • C. DUKHIRA, Mauritius and local government management, All India Institute of Local Self-Government, 1992, 374 pp.

  • D. FOK KAN, Introduction au droit du travail mauricien. Les relations individuelles du travail, 1ère éd. 1995, 2e éd. 2009, 522 pp.

  • R. GARRON/G. MAZIOTTA, A handbook on practice of banking techniques in Mauritius, Mauritius Bankers’ Association, 1996

  • G. GEORGIJEVIC, Droit civil mauricien – Les contrats, partie générale, préf. Ph. Delmas Saint-Hilaire, Éditions universitaires européennes, 2011, 237 pp.

  • G. GEORGIJEVIC, Les promesses de contracter en droit mauricien, Éditions universitaires européennes, 2011, 148 pp.

  • R. GUNPUTH, Introduction to Law and Legal Methods, Univ. of Mauritius, 2003

  • R. GUNPUTH, Traité de droit civil mauricien. Une contribution à la recherche relative à l’interprétation du Code civil mauricien à la lumière de la doctrine et de la jurisprudence française, Star Publications, 2008, 1114 pp.

  • R. GUNPUTH, La Cour suprême de l’île Maurice. Introduction au Droit mixte mauricien et contribution à la recherche des institutions judiciaires, Star Publications, 2009, 295 pp.

  • R. GUNPUTH, Cas pratiques du droit de la famille, Swan Printing, 2009, 102 pp.

  • R. GUNPUTH, Treaty of Mauritian Criminal Law and Public Litigation: Practice and Procedure, Univ. of Mauritius, 2009, 949 pp.

  • R. GUNPUTH, Labour and industrial relations law, Univ. of Mauritius, 2010, 647 pp.

  • J. KŒNIG, Une vie pour la justice. Biographie de Jules Kœnig. Histoire de l’île Maurice contemporaine, Mauritius Printing & Co. Ltd., 1979, 140 pp.

  • M. LAM HUNG, La femme devant la loi, Mauritius Family Planning, 1998, 113 pp.

  • M. LAM HUNG, L’enfant devant la loi, Save the children Mauritius, 1999, 108 pp.

  • M. LAM HUNG, La personne handicapée en milieu mauricien, 2001, 98 pp.

  • M. LAM HUNG, The rights of the child in Mauritius, T-Printers Co., 2001, 149 pp.

  • M. LAM HUNG, Rights of women in Mauritius, High Quality Press, 2003, 208 pp.

  • M. LAM HUNG, Right of stay in Mauritius, 2004, 132 pp.

  • M. LAM HUNG, Doing Business in Mauritius. A Practical Guide, 2009, 241 pp.

  • M. LAM HUNG, Property in Mauritius. Acquisition, Inheritance and Taxation, 2009, 169 pp.

  • M. LAM HUNG, Divorce & legal implications, 2011, 165 pp.

  • J. MANRAKHAN, A Reading of the Law at Réduit, Éditions de l’océan Indien, 1994, 149 pp.

  • H. MATHUR, Parliament in Mauritius, Éditions de l’océan Indien, 1991, 321 pp.

  • M. MOSAFEER, An Insight into Mauritius Tax Conventions, Éditions du Printemps, 2015

  • M. NAMDARKHAN/M. MEETARBHAN/Y. RAJAHBALEE, Why Mauritius? A National Court in Support of International Arbitration, LCIA MIAC, 2016, 116 pp. [Lien]

  • G. NAPAL, Disclosing Corruption: A Move Towards Transparency in Mauritius, éd. Le Prin­temps, 2001, 170 pp.

  • R. PILLAY, The Changing Nature of Corporate Social Responsibility: CSR and Development – The Case of Mauritius, Routledge, 2015, 294 pp.

  • K. RAGHUNANDAN, Mauritian Criminal Evidence, Proag Printing, 1990, 280 pp.

  • J.-M. RAINAUD, Le problème constitutionnel de l’île Maurice, coll. Annales de la faculté de droit et des sciences économiques d’Aix-en-Provence. Série Travaux et mémoires, éd. Cujas, 1966, 40 pp.

  • D. RAMSEWAK, The Constitution: its legal aspect and political philosophy, Proag Printing, 1ère éd. 1991, 2e éd. 1997, 125 pp.

  • O. RUMMUN, Rule of Law in Mauritius, Neo Press, 1963, 60 pp.

  • P. SAND, United States and Britain in Diego Garcia: The Future of a Controversial Base, Palgrave Macmillan, 2009, 210 pp.

  • P. SAND, Atoll Diego Garcia: Naturschutz zwischen Menschenrecht und Machtpolitik, Herbert Utz Verlag, 2011, 239 pp. (compte rendu d‘E. AFSAH, in : European Journal of International Law 2011 [vol. 22], pp. 1200-1204 [Lien])

  • D. SORNUM, Getting Into International Arbitration, Editions de l’océan Indien, 2013, 400 pp.

  • P. TORUL/R. GUNPUTH, Procedural Fairness in the Law of Unfair Dismissal in Mauritius and South Africa, Star Publications, 2e éd. 2012

  • R. d’UNIENVILLE, Livre blanc sur la révision du Code civil mauricien, Impr. du Gouvernement, 1975, 30 pp.

  • R. d’UNIENVILLE, Célicourt Antelme et le français en Cour suprême, Government Printing Dpt., 2009, 181 pp.

  • R. d’UNIENVILLE, L’évolution du droit civil à l’île Maurice (1721-1968), Best Graphics, 1994, 436 pp. (reprint Temple Law Books/LexisNexis, 2012)

  • MINISTRY OF LABOUR, INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS AND EMPLOYMENT, Employment rights act 2008: Workers’ Guide / Guide à l’intention des travailleurs, Ministry of Labour, Industrial Relations and Employment, 2014, 40 pp.

  • THE MAURITIUS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY, The Mauritian Legislation on Competition. A Practical Guide for the Business Community, MCCI, 60 pp.

Historical Books

  • Recueil complet des lois et règlement de l’île Maurice ou Ile de France, Impr. Mallac Frères, 1823

  • J.-B. DELALEU, Codes des îles de France et de Bourbon, Chez Tristan Mallac et Cie, 2e éd. 1826, 333 pp. + 112 pp. [Lien]

  • L. THIBAUD, General index to the laws of Mauritius in force on 1st January 1886, Mercantile Record Co., 1886, 139 pp.

  • The Laws of Mauritius

  • 1ère éd. 1896-1897, 3 vol. (sous la dir. F. PIGGOTT/L. THIBAUD/F. HERCHENRODER)

  • 2e éd. 1905, 7 vol. (sous la dir. de F. HERCHENRODER/L. THIBAUD/F. PIGGOTT)

  • 3e éd. 1922-1924, 8 vol. (sous la dir. de F. HERCHENRODER/E. KOENIG)

  • C. LANE, The Laws of Mauritius in Force on the 31st day of July, 1945, Waterlow and Sons, 1946, 5 vol.

  • P. HAREL, L’Angleterre et la loi civile française à l’île Maurice (ancienne Ile de France), th. Paris, A. Rousseau, 1899, 215 pp. [Lien]

  • G. NEWTON, Bankruptcy Law of Mauritius, Central Printing Establishment, 1ère éd. 1888, 2e éd. 1892, 535 pp.

  • G. NEWTON, Modifications apportées au code civil français par la législation de l’île Maurice : analyse sommaire, Hemmerlé, 1907, 62 pp.

  • W. NEWTON, De la naturalisation dans les colonies anglaises : la naturalisation obtenue à l’île Maurice fait-elle perdre la qualité de Français ? : réponse à M. le garde des sceaux de France, General Steaming Printing Co., 1883, 20 pp.

  • C. PÉROMBELON/L. BÉRANGER, Guide pratique en matière de successions, Imprimerie Minerva, 1911, 42 pp.

  • J. SLADE, Essay on the Administration of Justice in Mauritius, Port Louis, 1856

Doctoral and master theses

  • D. ANTELME, La responsabilité du dirigeant dans les entreprises commerciales de droit mauricien, mém. Réunion, 1992, 77 pp.

  • Z.-B. CASSAMALLY, L’influence respective de la "Civil Law" et de la "Common Law" en droit mauricien des sûretés, th. Paris 1, 2012, 497 pp.

  • J. COLOM, Droit maritime mauricien : le contrat de transport maritime de marchandises, mém. Aix-Marseille 3, 1981

  • J. COLOM, La justice constitutionnelle dans les États du nouveau Commonwealth : le cas de l’île Maurice, th. Aix-Marseille 3, 1994, 243 pp.

  • S. G. DOMAH, Une analyse des droits français, anglais et mauricien en matière de responsabilité du fait des choses, th. Aix-Marseille 3, 1979, 229 pp.

  • DOMINGUE, The Application of the Law of Injunctions in the Mauritian Case Law, 1987, 92 pp.

  • P. DOOKHY, Le Comité judiciaire du Conseil privé de Sa Majesté la Reine Elisabeth II d'Angleterre et le droit mauricien, th. Paris 1, 1997, 350 pp.

  • R. GUNPUTH, L’interprétation du Code Napoléon par les juridictions mauriciennes, th. Montpellier/La Réunion, 2005, 666 pp. + annexes [Lien]

  • P. HAREL, L’Angleterre et la loi civile française à l’île Maurice (anciennement Ile de France), th. Paris, A. Rousseau, 1899, 215 pp.

  • Y. HEIN, Diego-Garcia, une île pas comme les autres, mém. Aix-Marseille 3, 1983, 86 pp.

  • N. JAMALKHAN, What is the Impact of the Cyber Crime Act on the Business Community in Mauritius?, th. Durban (gestion), 2004 [Lien]

  • M. KEOBOTSAMANG TONG, Le droit à l'autodétermination et à restitution : l'affaire du peuple de l'archipel des Chagos, th. Strasbourg, 2009 [Lien]

  • D. NAPAL, Constitutional development of Mauritius 1810-1948, th. Londres, 1962, 196 pp.

  • M. TONG, Le droit à l’autodétermination et à restitution : L’affaire du peuple de l’archipel des Chagos (Territoire Britannique de l’Océan Indien), th. Strasbourg, 2009, 299 pp. [Lien]

  • P. TORUL, The Mauritian law of procedural fairness within the context of dismissal for misconduct : a comparative study with the South African doctrine of unfair labour practice, mém. Durban, 2001, 345 pp. [Lien]

  • R. D’UNIENVILLE, L’évolution du droit civil à l’île Maurice, th. Aix-en-Provence, 1968, 391 pp.

Periodicals

  • Bar Chronicle, 1988-1997 (5 numéros parus)

  • Mauritius Criminal Law Review, 2013-

  • Mauritius Law Review, 1977-1982 (1ère série) et 1988 (2nde série) (4 numéros parus)

  • Mauritius Business Law Review / Revue du droit des affaires Ile Maurice 2009- [Lien]

  • Research Journal of the University of Mauritius, 1998-2016 (22 numéros parus)

  • The New Bar Chronicle. The Journal of the Legal Profession, 2009-

Journal Articles

  • G. ABRAHAM, « Paradise claimed: disputed sovereignty over the Chagos Archipelago »,

  • South African Law Journal 2011 (vol. 128), pp. 63-99

  • E. AFSAH, « Diego Garcia (British Indian Ocean Territory) », in : R. Wolfrum (sous la dir.), The Max Planck Encyclopedia of Public International Law, Oxford University Press, 2012, vol. 3

  • É. AGOSTINI, « Heurs et malheurs du mariage religieux à l’île Maurice », in : Liber Amicorum. Études offertes à Pierre Jaubert, Presses univ. Bordeaux, 1992, pp. 21-33

  • É. AGOSTINI, « Responsabilité du fait des choses – L’Île Maurice est encore l’Isle de France », Mélanges Christian Mouly, Litec, 1998, t. 2, pp. 3-11

  • É. AGOSTINI, « Actualité des codes français à l’île Maurice », in : Apprendre à douter : questions de droit, questions sur le droit – Études offertes à Claude Lombois, Pulim, 2004, pp. 37-51

  • É. AGOSTINI, « Le code de commerce de 1807 à l’île Maurice », in : Histoire, théorie et pratique du droit. Études offertes à Michel Vidal, PUB, 2010, pp. 21-35

  • R. AHMINE, « The Treatment of Victims of Crime under our Criminal Justice System », Mauritius Criminal Law Review 2013 (n° 1), pp. 117-126

  • S. ALLEN, « Looking Beyond the Bancoult Cases: International Law and the Prospect of Resettling the Chagos Islands », Human Rights Law Review 2007 (vol. 7), pp. 441-482 [Lien]

  • S. ALLEN, « International Law and the Resettlement of the (Outer) Chagos Islands », Human Rights Law Review 2008 (vol. 8), pp. 683-702 [Lien]

  • ANGELO, « Mauritius: The Basis of the Legal System », Comparative & International Law Journal of South Africa 1970 (vol. 3), pp. 228-241

  • ANGELO, « Comparative Family Law: Mauritius », Journal of Family Law 1970-1971 (vol. 10), pp. 144-157 [Lien]

  • ANGELO, « The Mauritius Approach to Article 1384 of the French Civil Code », Comparative & International Law Journal of South Africa 1971 (vol. 4), pp. 57-71

  • ANGELO, « French and English Legal Cultures meet - Aspects of recent Mauritian Legislation », Comparative & International Law Journal of South Africa 1976 (vol. 9), pp. 372-377

  • ANGELO, « Article 1384 (1) of the Mauritius Civil Code – The continuing story », Comparative & International Law Journal of South Africa 1980 (vol. 13), pp. 204-211

  • ANGELO, « The Trust and Mauritius », in : De tous horizons : Mélanges Xavier Blanc-Jouvan, Société de législation comparée, 2005, pp. 681-706

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  • R. GARRON, « Un exemple d’interaction des systèmes : le droit des sûretés à l’île Maurice », in : La formation du droit national dans les pays de droit mixte : Systèmes juridiques de common law et de droit civil, PUAM, 1989, pp. 137-143

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  • R. GUNPUTH, « Du droit positif sur les déracinés de la terre dans les anciennes colonies : le cas de l’île Maurice », Revue juridique et politique des états francophones 2006, pp. 530-559

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  • R. GUNPUTH, « Le Comité judiciaire du Conseil privé dans les anciennes colonies anglaises : Les pouvoirs, compétences et mécanismes de pourvoi selon les lois en vigueur », University of Mauritius Research Journal 2009 (n° 16), pp. 387-412 [Lien]

  • R. GUNPUTH, « Projet de réforme électorale prospective en droit constitutionnel ou la pratique du Best Loser System et du système proportionnel au service du pluralisme ethnique : justice constitutionnelle ou injustice parlementaire ? Le cas de l’île Maurice », Revue française de droit constitutionnel 2009, pp. 431-445 [Lien]

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  • R. JOMADAR/C. de LABAUVE d’ARIFAT, « L’organisation judiciaire de l’Île Maurice en matière civile », Revue juridique et politique. Indépendance et coopération 1969, pp. 809-816

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  • T. KOENIG, « Can the Court Grant Leave Retrospectively, nunc pro tunc », The New Bar Chronicle 2011 (n° 3), pp. 23-28 [entreprises en difficulté]

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  • de LABAUVE d’ARIFAT, « L’enfant devant la justice à l’Ile Maurice », Revue juridique et politique. Indépendance et coopération 1977, pp. 363-369

  • de LABAUVE d’ARIFAT, « Le Directeur des poursuites publiques à l’île Maurice », Annuaire des pays de l’océan Indien 1976 (vol. 3), pp. 513-518 (également reproduit in : Mauritius Law Review 1978 [n° 2], pp. 145-153)

  • R. LALLAH, « Prisons in the context of human rights norms », Lazol 1990 (n° 1), pp. 15-16

  • J. LARUS, « Diego Garcia : the military and legal limitations of America’s pivotal base in the Indian Ocean », in : W. Dowdy (sous la dir.), The Indian Ocean: Perspectives on a Strategic Arena, Duke University Press, 1985, pp. 435-451

  • H. LASSEMILLANTE, « Dual Nationality now Possible », Bar Chronicle 1997, pp. 45-47

  • M. LAVOIPIERRE, « L’évolution du Droit pénal mauricien », in : Études de droit privé français et mauricien, PUF, 1969, pp. 127-135

  • J.-C. LEBLANC, « La vie constitutionnelle et politique de l’île Maurice de 1945 à 1968 », Annales de l’Université de Madagascar. Droit 1969 (n° 6), pp. 9-176 [Lien]

  • LOUIT, « Chronique politique et constitutionnelle. L’Ile Maurice. 1977 », Annuaire des pays de l’océan Indien 1977 (vol. 4), pp. 371-394

  • C. LOUIT, « Chronique politique et constitutionnelle. L’Ile Maurice. 1979 », Annuaire des pays de l’océan Indien 1979 (vol. 6), pp. 309-332

  • C. LOUIT, « Chronique politique et constitutionnelle. L’Ile Maurice. 1980 », Annuaire des pays de l’océan Indien 1980 (vol. 7), pp. 389-411

  • C. LOUIT, « Chronique politique et constitutionnelle. L’Ile Maurice. 1981 », Annuaire des pays de l’océan Indien 1981 (vol. 8), pp. 291-299

  • C. LOUIT, « Chronique politique et constitutionnelle. L’Ile Maurice. 1982-1983 », Annuaire des pays de l’océan Indien 1982-1983 (vol. 9), pp. 401-431

  • T. LYNCH, « Diego Garcia : Competing Claims to a Strategic Isle », Case Western Reserve Journal of International Law 1984 (vol. 16), pp. 101-123 [Lien]

  • H. MAIGROT/D. MAIGROT, « Constructions illicites dans les ensembles immobiliers réglementés : la sanction est la démolition », The New Bar Chronicle 2010 (n° 2), pp. 27-29

  • R. MARRIER d’UNIENVILLE, « L’évolution du Droit civil mauricien », in : Études de droit privé français et mauricien, PUF, 1969, pp. 89-108

  • R. MATHUR, « Accession of Mauritius to republican status: some political and constitutional changes », Bulletin mensuel du PROSI 1992 (n° 278), pp. 14-16, 19

  • K. MATLOSA, « Electoral Systems, Constitutionalism and Conflict Management in Southern Africa », African Journal on Conflict Resolution 2004 (vol. 4), pp. 11-53 [Lien]

  • M. McGOWAN, « Changing Attitudes to Achieve Fairness and Justice for the Vulnerable », Mauritius Criminal Law Review 2014-2015 (n° 2), pp. 8-15

  • C. MECK, « Land Tenure in Mauritius and Fiji », Journal of Comparative Legislation 1943 (vol. 26), pp. 42-49

  • K. MEETARBHAN/J. DAVIES, « The New Competition Regime in Mauritius », The New Bar Chronicle 2010 (n° 2), pp. 15-17

  • M. MEETARBHAN, « Extra-Constitutional Parliamentary Private Secretaries in Mauritius », Journal of African Law 1991 (vol. 35), pp. 194-197 [Lien]

  • M. MEETARBHAN, « L’évolution de la Constitution mauricienne depuis 1968 », APOI, 1995-1996, Volume XIV, p. 23-40

  • J.-L. MESTRE, « Les juristes français et le droit mauricien à la fin du XIXe siècle », Annuaire des pays de l’océan Indien 1979 (vol. 6), pp. 167-175

  • M. MINOGUE, « The public administration in Mauritius », Journal of Administration Overseas 1976 (vol. 15), pp. 160-166

  • Y. MOATTY, « La Commission nationale des droits de l’homme à l’île Maurice », Revue juridique de l’océan Indien 2003-2004 (n° 4), pp. 183-188 [Lien]

  • H. MOOLLAN, « Les difficultés d’application des codes français à l’île Maurice et les projets de codification », in : Études de droit privé français et mauricien, PUF, 1969, pp. 137-150

  • S. MOOLLAN/T. LANDAU/R. DIWAN, « Travaux préparatoires de la loi mauricienne », Revue de l’arbitrage 2009, pp. 970-1001

  • S. MOOLLAN, « The Amendments to the Mauritius International Arbitration Act 2008 and the New Mauritian Supreme Court Rules for International Arbitration », Mauritius Business Law Review 2013 (n° 5), pp. 12-16

  • MOOTOO, « Till Death do us Part: Intention to Kill Revisited », Mauritius Criminal Law Review 2013 (n° 1), pp. 127-134

  • D. MOOTOO, « A Charter for Witnesses », Mauritius Criminal Law Review 2014-2015 (n° 2), pp. 1-7

  • P. MOOTOOSAMY, « La nationalité mauricienne », Revue juridique et politique. Indépendance et coopération 1971, pp. 543-544

  • P. MOOTOOSAMY, « Successions et régimes matrimoniaux à l’île Maurice », Revue juridique et politique. Indépendance et coopération 1972, pp. 749-756

  • S. MOOTOOSAMY, « Evolution d’un régime de sécurité sociale : l’expérience de l’île Maurice », Revue internationale de sécurité sociale 1981 (vol. 34), pp. 485-503 (également paru en langue anglaise sous le titre « Developing the social security system: the experience of Mauritius », International Social Security Review 1981 [vol. 34], pp. 446-461)

  • M. MOURBY, « Tracing the Fault Lines: Prosecutorial Discretion since Mohit v DPP », Mauritius Criminal Law Review 2014-2015 (n° 2), pp. 164-174

  • L. MOUTOU, « Le droit à l’image », Bar Chronicle 1989 (n° 1), pp. 38-43

  • M. MÜHLHANS, « Eheschließungsrecht auf Mauritius », StAZ Das Standesamt 1987, pp. 292-293

  • J. MUJUZI, « The Evolution of the Meaning(s) of Penal Servitude for Life (Life Imprisonment) in Mauritius: The Human Rights and Jurisprudential Challenges Confronted so far and Those Ahead », Journal of African Law 2009 (vol. 53), pp. 222-248 [Lien]

  • J. MUJUZI, « The Supreme Court of Mauritius and the Objectives of Punishment in Sentencing Offenders to Penal Servitude for Life and to Other Lengthy Prisons Terms in Drugs-Related Cases: A Look at Recent Case Law », Research Journal of the University of Mauritius 2009 (n° 15), pp. 634-650 [Lien]

  • M. NAMDARKHAN, « Overview of Certain Aspects of the Insolvency Act 2009 (“IA 2009”) », The New Bar Chronicle 2010 (n° 2), pp. 41-45

  • M. NAMDARKHAN, « Summary of Key Corporate Insolvency Cases Since 2009 », The New Bar Chronicle 2013 (n° 4), pp. 12-19

  • H. NARSINGHEN, « Dispute Settlement Process under GATT/WTO. Diplomatic or Judicial Process », University of Mauritius Research Journal 1999 (n° 2), pp. 97-110 [Lien]

  • V. NASSIBOU, « Les traités de non double imposition », Mauritius Business Law Review 2012 (n° 4), pp. 31-35 [Lien]

  • D. NAYAK, « Data Protection Law in Mauritius », The New Bar Chronicle 2011 (n° 3), pp. 41-45

  • L. NUCKCHADY, « The Stock Exchange Act 1988 (Part VII) », Bar Chronicle 1990 (n° 3), pp. 13-16 et 33

  • R. OLLARD, « De l’opportunité de la pénalisation de la transmission du virus de l’immuno­déficience humaine par voie sexuelle : Analyse de droit compare franco-mauricien », Mauritius Criminal Law Review 2014-2015 (n° 2), pp. 44-54

  • R. OLLARD, « Réflexions sur la réforme du Code pénal mauricien », The New Bar Chronicle 2016 (n° 5), pp. 10-13

  • M. OOZEER, « What’s in a Name? », The New Bar Chronicle 2009 (n° 1), pp. 30-34 [nom commercial]

  • M. OOZEER, « Legal risks associated with web sites », Mauritius Business Law Review 2010 (n° 2), pp. 19-22 [Lien] and 2011 (n° 3), pp. 36-40 [Lien]

  • M. OOZEER, « Legal Insight into Electronic Transactions: A Mauritian Perspective », The New Bar Chronicle 2011 (n° 3), pp. 46-52

  • ORAISON, « Les avatars du B.I.O.T. (British Indian Ocean Territory). Le processus de

  • l’implantation militaire américaine à Diego Garcia », Annuaire des pays de l’océan Indien 1979 (vol. 6), pp. 177-209

  • ORAISON, « À propos du conflit franco-mauricien sur le récif de Tromelin (La succession d’États sur l’ancienne île de Sable) », Revue de droit international, de sciences diplomatiques et politiques 1987 (vol. 65), pp. 85-139

  • ORAISON, « Le processus de l’implantation militaire américaine à Diego Garcia et ses répercussions dans l’océan Indien », Collection Espaces et Ressources Maritimes 1988 (n° 3), pp. 159-173

  • ORAISON, « À propos du litige anglo-mauricien sur l’archipel des Chagos (La succession d’États sur les îles Diego Garcia, Peros Bahnos et Salomon) », Revue belge de droit international 1990, pp. 5-53 [Lien]

  • ORAISON, « Une base militaire américaine au cœur de l'océan Indien (La cession à bail stratégique de l'archipel britannique des Chagos aux États-Unis et la militarisation progressive de l'atoll de Diego Garcia) », Revue de droit international, de sciences diplomatiques et politiques 2002, pp. 223-263

  • ORAISON, « La genèse de la base militaire américaine installée aux îles Chagos (Fondement de la militarisation progressive de l’île principale du territoire britannique de l’océan Indien et utilisation effective de la base aéronavale de Diego Garcia de 1966 à 2003) », Revue juridique de l’océan Indien 2002-2003 (n° 3), pp. 303-314 [Lien]

  • ORAISON, « Le différend anglo-mauricien sur l'archipel des Chagos à la lumière de la théorie des vices de consentement (Le consentement des dirigeants mauriciens a-t-il été entaché par les vices de violence, de dol et de lésion en 1965 lors de la cession à la Grande-Bretagne des îles de Diego Garcia, Peros Banhos et Salomon ?) », Revue de la recherche juridique. Droit prospectif 2003, pp. 2837-2865

  • ORAISON, « Diego Garcia : enjeux de la présence américaine dans l'océan Indien », Afrique contemporaine 2003 (n° automne), pp. 115-132

  • ORAISON, « À propos du différend anglo-mauricien sur l'archipel des Chagos (La succession d'États sur les îles Diego Garcia, Peros Banhos et Salomon) », Annuaire des pays de l’océan Indien 2003-2005 (vol. 18), pp. 201-278

  • ORAISON, « Le drame des populations déportées des îles Diego Garcia, Peros Banhos et Salomon. L’éternel combat du pot de terre contre le pot de fer », Revue de la recherche juridique. Droit prospectif 2005, pp. 1633-1648

  • ORAISON, « Le contentieux territorial anglo-mauricien sur l'archipel des Chagos revisité (Quelles perspectives d'avenir pour les originaires des îles Diego Garcia, Peros Banhos et Salomon et leurs descendants déportés à Maurice ?) », Revue de droit international, de sciences diplomatiques et politiques 2005, pp. 109-208

  • ORAISON, « À propos du conflit franco-mauricien sur le récif de Tromelin (La succession d'États sur l'ancienne Isle de Sable) », Revue de droit international, de sciences diplomatiques et politiques 2008, pp. 1-115

  • ORAISON, « À propos des populations déportées des îles Chagos par les autorités britanniques : quel avenir pour les "Palestiniens de l’océan Indien" ? », Diplomatie, Affaires Stratégiques et Relations Internationales 2011 (n° 50), pp. 86-92

  • ORAISON, « Radioscopie critique de la querelle franco-mauricienne sur le récif de Tromelin (La succession d'États sur l'ancienne Isle de Sable) », Revue juridique de l’océan Indien 2012 (n° 14), pp. 5-118 [Lien]

  • ORAISON, « Radioscopie critique de la querelle anglo-mauricienne sur l’archipel des Chagos (La succession d’États sur les îles stratégiques de Diego Garcia, Peros Banhos et Salomon, ancrées au cœur du bassin central de l’Océan Indien) », Revue juridique de l’océan Indien 2013 (n° 17), pp. 25-86 [Lien]

  • ORAISON, « Réflexions critiques sur l’accord-cadre franco-mauricien du 7 juin 2010 relatif à la cogestion économique, scientifique et environnementale du récif de Tromelin et de ses espaces maritimes environnants », Revue juridique de l’océan Indien 2015 (n° 20), pp. 129-168 [Lien]

  • ORAISON/F. MICLO, « Les îles Tromelin, Glorieuses, Juan de Nova, Europa et Bassas da India (Des curiosités juridiques) », Recueil Penant 1974, pp. 136-170

  • ORAISON/F. MICLO, « A qui appartient le récif de Tromelin ? », Annuaire des pays de l’océan Indien 1976 (vol. 3), pp. 269-289

  • ORAISON/F. MICLO, « A qui appartient le récif de Tromelin (Éléments nouveaux et précisions) ? », Annuaire des pays de l’océan Indien 1978 (vol. 5), pp. 263-280

  • PARISOT, « La jurisprudence mauricienne et la responsabilité du fait des choses », Cahiers du Centre universitaire de La Réunion 1975 (vol. 5), pp. 82-97

  • PEEROO, « Information – For a Fair Trial », The New Bar Chronicle 2010 (n° 2), pp. 63-66

  • J. PEEROO/A. GUILMAIN, « Pour une réforme du droit mauricien de l’arbitrage international en matière de reconnaissance et d’exécution des sentences », The New Bar Chronicle 2011 (n° 3), pp. 9-14

  • J. PEEROO/A. GUILMAIN, « L’arbitrage international dans l’avant-projet de nouveau code de procédure civile : un regard critique », The New Bar Chronicle 2013 (n° 4), pp. 53-56

  • PERRY, « Interpretation and the Practice of Law », Mauritius Criminal Law Review 2014-2015 (n° 2), pp. 85-97

  • L. PERTAB, « Remnants of Sex Discrimination », Bar Chronicle 1997, pp. 26-28

  • PIETTE/G. GEORGIJEVIC, « La réforme du droit mauricien des sûretés », Revue internationale de droit comparé 2014, pp. 1071-1091

  • PILLAY, « Product Liability in Mauritius », Mauritius Law Review 1977 (n° 1), pp. 45-58

  • PILLAY, « Of Accomplices and Co-Authors », Mauritius Law Review 1978 (n° 2), pp. 69-84

  • PILLAY, « Droit et pratique de l’arbitrage à Maurice », Les Petites Affiches 3 décembre 2009, pp. 15-19

  • POMART, « Réflexions libres autour de la répression de l’instigation en droit pénal », Mauritius Criminal Law Review 2014-2015 (n° 2), pp. 152-163

  • S. PUDARUTH/K. SUNJIV SOYDAUDAH/R. GUNPUTH, « Categorisation of Supreme Court Cases Using Multiple Horizontal Thesauri », in: S. Berretti/S. Thampi/S. Dasgupta (sous la dir.), Intelligent Systems Technologies and Applications, Springer, 2016, pp. 355-368

  • QUINONES, « Les résultats de la codification dans les pays de tradition anglo-saxonne de l’océan Indien : l’exemple de Maurice et des Seychelles », Revue juridique de l’océan Indien 2003-2004 (n° 4), pp. 143-147 [Lien]

  • R. RAMESSUR/R. GUNPUTH/T. RAMESSUR, « Climate compatible development: legal implications in the coastal zone and inclusive development for Mauritius », Journal of Coastal Development 2016 (vol. 16) [Lien]

  • R. RAMLOLL, « Residence based taxation: are we at the end of the road? » Mauritius Business Law Review 2011 (n° 3), pp. 8-13 [Lien]

  • RAUMNAUTH/R. MAHADEW, « Assessing the responsibilities of the United Kingdom and Mauritius towards the Chagossians under international law », Afrika Focus 2016 (vol. 29), pp. 39-57 [Lien]

  • M. RAULT, « La responsabilité de l’Etat du fait de ses préposés en droit mauricien », Revue juridique et politique. Indépendance et coopération 1973, pp. 873-884

  • M. RAULT, « La femme mariée en droit mauricien, apparences et réalités », Revue juridique et politique. Indépendance et coopération 1974, pp. 731-742

  • M. RAULT, « L’homme et la machine ou Les mécanismes juridiques de protection des droits de la personne à l’île Maurice », Mauritius Law Review 1982 (n° 4), pp. 7-18 [libertés publiques]

  • D. RAWOAH, « FATF Recommendation 2: The Quest for Co-Operation », Mauritius Criminal Law Review 2014-2015 (n° 2), pp. 71-84

  • REETOO, « The Criminal Appeal (Amendment) Act 2013 – A Watershed in the Criminal Justice Landscape of Mauritius », Mauritius Criminal Law Review 2013 (n° 1), pp. 93-102

  • ROBERT, « L’évolution du Droit commercial mauricien », in : Études de droit privé français et mauricien, PUF, 1969, pp. 109-125

  • ROBERT, « Responsabilité des administrateurs de sociétés et de compagnies en droit mauricien », Revue juridique et politique. Indépendance et coopération 1973, pp. 801-814

  • ROBERT, « Brief overview of the law of insurance in Mauritius », Mauritius Business Law Review 2010 (n° 2), pp. 14-19

  • S. ROHLFING-DIJOUX, « Droits français et anglais réconciliés dans une synthèse originale du droit des affaires mauricien », Revue juridique de l’océan Indien 2005 (n° spécial), pp. 65-79 [Lien]

  • S. ROHLFING-DIJOUX, « Die Reform des Rechts über gewerblichen Rechtsschutz in Mauritius: Ende des Paradieses für Markenpiraten? », GRUR Int. 2005, pp. 566-569

  • S. ROHLFING-DIJOUX, « Das gemischte Rechtssystem (droit mixte) in Mauritius – Eine Erbschaft aus der englischen und französischen Kolonialzeit », Zeitschrift für Europäisches Privatrecht 2006, pp. 630-655

  • S. ROHLFING-DIJOUX, « La protection pénale de la propriété intellectuelle, à l’exemple du droit des marques : Étude comparée des droits mauricien, français et allemand », Mauritius Criminal Law Review 2014-2015 (n° 2), pp. 98-112

  • V. ROY-BUNWAREE, « IRS and RES projects: the legal framework », Mauritius Business Law Review 2010 (n° 2), pp. 35-38 [Lien]

  • P. SAND, « Diego Garcia: British–American Legal Black Hole in the Indian Ocean? », Journal of Environmental Law 2009 (vol. 21), pp. 113-137 [Lien] (également publié en version française sous le titre « Diego Garcia : nouveau "trou noir" dans l’Océan indien ? », Revue générale de droit international public 2009, pp. 365-374)

  • P. SAND, « The Chagos Archipelago: Footprints of empire, or world heritage », Environmental Policy and Law 2010 (vol. 40), pp. 232-242

  • K. SEETHIAH, « Protection against Deprivation of Property », Bar Chronicle 1990 (n° 3), pp. 28-30

  • DE SENNEVILLE/J. JEAUSSERAND, « Du bon usage des sociétés ‘offshore’ mauriciennes par les entreprises françaises », Revue juridique de l’océan Indien 2001 (n° 1), pp. 171-174 [Lien] et 2001-2002 (n° 2), pp. 299-307 [Lien]

  • J.-B. SEUBE, « Le recours au droit français par la Cour suprême de Maurice », conf. non publiée, 8 pp. [Lien]

  • J.-B. SEUBE, « Projet mauricien de réforme du droit des sûretés : Réflexion sur la mention manuscrite et la protection de la caution », The New Bar Chronicle 2016 (n° 5), pp. 32-34

  • SINATAMBOU, « The restriction order in the La Balise Marina Project: an erosion of environmental protection? », Mauritius Business Law Review 2012 (n° 4), pp. 9-14 [Lien]

  • SMITH, « The Permanent Court of Arbitration and its Role in the Mauritius International Arbitration Project », Mauritius Business Law Review 2013 (n° 5), pp. 17-21

  • S. de SMITH, « Mauritius: Constitutionalism in a Plural Society », Modern Law Review 1968 (vol. 11), pp. 601-622

  • DE SMITH, « L’exportation du modèle de Westminster et la constitution mauricienne », APOI, 1995-1996, p. 41-49

  • S. SOOPRAMANIEN, « The International Arbitration Act of Mauritius: addressing the challenges and opportunities of an emerging international arbitration center in Africa », Internationalarbitration law review 2013 (vol. 16), pp. 4-18

  • K. STARMER, « Human Rights, Victims and the Prosecution of Crime in the 21st Century », Mauritius Criminal Law Review 2013 (n° 1), pp. 49-62

  • R. STEPHEN/W. RANGAN/N. OHSAN-BELLEPEAU, « Critical issues in Judicial Reform », Bar Chronicle 1997, pp. 13-16

  • M. TANCELIN, « Problématique de la mixité du droit : Le cas de deux pays de l’océan Indien, Maurice et les Seychelles », Annuaire des pays de l’océan Indien 1981 (vol. 8), pp. 95-101 (également reproduit in : L’Europe et l’océan Indien : un cas particulier des relations Nord-Sud, éd. CNRS/PUAM)

  • TOUSSAINT, « Histoire du Droit et des Institutions de l’Ile-de-France et de l’Ile Bourbon jusqu’en 1815 », in : Études de droit privé français et mauricien, PUF, 1969, pp. 35-42

  • R. d’UNIENVILLE, « Le statut juridique des immigrants à l’île Maurice », in : Mouvements de Populations dans l'Océan Indien, Librairie Honoré Champion, 1979, p. 35

  • J. VELLIEN, « International arbitration in Mauritius », Mauritius Business Law Review 2012 (n° 4), pp. 27-30 [Lien]

  • L. VENCHARD, « La femme mauricienne et le droit », Annuaire des pays de l’océan Indien 1976 (vol. 3), pp. 639-649 (également publié in Mauritius Law Review 1978 [n° 2], pp. 17-31)

  • L. VENCHARD, « L’application du droit mixte à l’île Maurice », Mauritius Law Review 1982 (n° 4), pp. 29-44

  • L. VENCHARD, « L’évolution du droit pénal mauricien », in : Code pénal annoté, Best Graphics, 1994

  • VINE, « The Impoverishment of Displacement: Models for Documenting Human Rights Abuses and the People of Diego Garcia », Human Rights Brief 2006 (vol. 13, n° 2), pp. 21-24, 32 [Lien]

  • WILLMAN, « Conviction Based Asset Recovery: How Far it Should Extend? », Mauritius Criminal Law Review 2014-2015 (n° 2), pp. 16-43

  • M. YOON/S. BUNWAREE, « Women’s Legislative Representation in Mauritius: ‘A Grave Democratic Deficit’ », Journal of Contemporary African Studies 2006, pp.229-247

Reports

  • MINISTERE DE LA JUSTICE, « L’application du droit mixte à l’île Maurice », Annuaire des pays de l’océan Indien 1980 (vol. 7), pp. 119-129

  • Livre blanc sur la révision du Code civil mauricien, Government of Mauritius, 1975

  • Rapport sur les mécanismes juridiques de protection des droits de la personne à l’île Maurice, Ministère de la Justice, in : Mauritius Law Review 1982 (n° 4), pp. 253-269

  • Report of the Presidential Commission to examine and report upon the structure and operation of the judicial system and legal professions of Mauritius, Government of Mauritius, 1997, 155 pp.

  • Rapports de la Law Reform Commission of Mauritius

  • Issue Paper « Successions et libéralités », 2014 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper « Other Aspects Law of ‘Successions & Libéralités’ », 2014 [Lien]

  • Report on Local Government Reform, 2009, 287 pp. [Lien]

  • Review Paper Law on Fraud, 2016 [Lien]

  • Review Paper Criminal Protection of Children's Rights, 2016 [Lien]

  • Interim Report Reform of Criminal Code, 2016 [Lien]

  • Interim Report on "Reform of Code de Commerce", 2016 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper on "Incorporation in Code Civil Mauricien of Provisions relating to Aspects of Private International Law", 2016 [Lien]

  • Review Paper on "Hague Conventions on Private International Law and Mauritian Law", 2016 [Lien]

  • Interim Report on "Reform of Code Civil Mauricien (Droit des personnes)", 2016 [Lien]

  • Interim Report on "Reform of Code Civil Mauricien (Droit extrapatrimonial de la famille)", 2016 [Lien]

  • Interim Report on "Reform Code Civil Mauricien (Droit patrimonial de la famille)" , 2016 [Lien]

  • Review Paper on Regulation of Activities of Real Estate Agents, 2016 [Lien]

  • Paper on Legislative Framework for Regulation of Activities of Real Estate Agents in Mauritius, 2016 [Lien]

  • Review Paper Statut des Personnes non-mariées vivant en couple, 2015 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper on Droit des biens, 2015 [Lien]

  • Paper on Changes to Book III of Criminal Code (Incorporation of Provisions on Cybercrime) , 2015 [Lien]

  • Report on Miscellaneous Aspects of Code de Commerce, 2015 [Lien]

  • Paper on Changes to Book III of Criminal Code (Offences against Persons) , 2015 [Lien]

  • Paper on Changes to Book III of Criminal Code (Offences against Property) , 2015 [Lien]

  • Paper on Changes to Provisions in Code Civil Mauricien about Louage des choses, bail à loyer et bail d’habitation, 2015 [Lien]

  • Report on Bail Commercial, 2015 [Lien]

  • Changes to Books I & II of Criminal Code (General Provisions), 2014 [Lien]

  • Changes to Book III of Criminal Code (Offences against Nation, State & Public Peace) , 2014 [Lien]

  • Changes to Book IV of Criminal Code (Contraventions), 2014 [Lien]

  • Report on Intermédiaires du commerce, 2014 [Lien]

  • Report on Encadrement des Opérations de Crédit, 2014 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper on Bail d'habitation, 2014 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper on Régimes Matrimoniaux, 2014 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper Other Aspects Law of Successions Liberalites, 2014 [Lien]

  • Opinion Paper Electoral Reform, 2014 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper Aspects of Family Law, 2014 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper Other Aspects Law of Successions Liberalites, 2014 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper Filiation Adoptive, 2014 [Lien]

  • Opinion Paper Effective Handling of Criminal Cases, 2014 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper Successions et libéralités, 2014 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper Specific Contracts, 2014 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper Majeurs Protégés, 2013 [Lien]

  • LRC Issue Paper Secured Transactions Reform, 2013 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper Offences against Property (1) Des appropriations frauduleuses, 2013 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper Offences against Property (2) [Autres Atteintes aux Biens] , 2013 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper Offences against the Nation, the State and Public Peace, 2013 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper Autorité Parentale, 2013 [Lien]

  • Review Paper Law on Surrogacy [Maternite pour autrui], 2013 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper Personnalite Juridique et Protection de la Personne Humaine, 2013 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper Nom de Famille, 2013 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper Law of Prescription under Code Civil Mauricien, 2013 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper Law of Contracts Obligations under Code Civil Mauricien, 2013 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper General Principles of Criminal Law, 2013 [Lien]

  • Report Mechanisms for Review of Alleged Wrongful Convictions or Acquittals, 2012 [Lien]

  • Report on New Regime Copropriété, 2012 [Lien]

  • Report on Incorporation of Provisions relating to Effets de Commerce (Lettre de Change & Billet à Ordre) in the Livre Premier of Code de Commerce, 2012 [Lien]

  • Report Droit des Sûretés, 2012 [Lien]

  • Report Copropriétés immeubles sociaux, 2012 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper Party and Witness Anonymity in Civil Proceedings, 2012 [Lien]

  • Issue paper Offences against Persons (Autres atteintes à la personne humaine), 2012 [Lien]

  • Report Code de Commerce (Livre 3e), 2012 [Lien]

  • Report Code de Commerce (Livre 2e), 2012 [Lien]

  • Opinion Paper Draft Police and Criminal Evidence Bill, 2012 [Lien]

  • Discussion paper on New Code de Procedure Civile, 2012 [Lien]

  • Report Code de Procedure Civile, 2012 [Lien]

  • Opinion Paper Offences against Persons (Re Draft Criminal Code (Amendment) Bill, 2012 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper on "Offences against Persons (Atteintes à la vie & à l'intégrité physique - homicides, menaces, violences)", 2011 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper on "Road Traffic Legislation and Penalty Points System", 2011 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper on "Crédit -Bail (Leasing)" , 2011 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper on "Establishment of Family Court and Conduct of Family Proceedings", 2011 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper on "Reform of Criminal Code", 2011 [Lien]

  • Discussion Paper Crédit-Bail, 2011 [Lien]

  • Report Crédit-Bail & Location Financière, 2011 [Lien]

  • Opinion Paper on "Liberalization of Usher Services", 2011 [Lien]

  • Opinion Paper on "Legal Aid Reform", 2011 [Lien]

  • Opinion Paper on "Appeal by Vexed Litigant", 2011 [Lien]

  • Opinion Paper on "Costs in Criminal Cases", 2011 [Lien]

  • Opinion Paper on "Attorney's Commission", 2011 [Lien]

  • Opinion Paper on "Establishment Court of Appeal and Composition of JLSC (Judicial and Legal Service Commission)", 2011 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper on TimeShare, 2011 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper on Law as to Publicity for Appointment and Revocation of Agent and Proxy, 2011 [Lien]

  • Report on Aspects of Consumer Laws, 2011 [Lien]

  • Report on "Mediation and Conciliation in Commercial Matters", 2010 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper on "Constitutional Protection of Human Rights" , 2010 [Lien]

  • Report on "Prevention of Vexatious Litigation", 2010 [Lien]

  • Background Paper on "Reform of Codes", 2010 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper on Criminal Investigation: Reform of Police Procedures and Practices, 2010 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper on Evidence of Reluctant/Intmidated Witness in Criminal Proceedings, 2010 [Lien]

  • Discussion Paper on Judicial Review, 2010 [Lien]

  • Issue Paper Social Partnership Framework, 2010 [Lien]

  • Report on Reform Local Governmet Framework, 2010 [Lien]

  • Working Paper Reform Local Government Framework, 2010 [Lien]

  • Report on Bail and Other Related Issues, 2010 [Lien]

  • Discussion Paper "Forensic Use of DNA", 2009, 81 pp. [Lien]

  • Issue Paper "The Office of Director of Public Prosecutions [DPP] and the Constitutional Requirement for its Operational Autonomy", 2009, 8 pp. [Lien]

  • Report "Law on Divorce", 2008, 27 pp. [Lien]

  • Issue Paper on "Equality/Anti-Discrimination Legislative Framework (Re Equal Opportunities Bill No. XXXVI of 2008)", 2008 [Lien]

  • Report "Law relating to NGOs: Legislative Proposals for a New Legal and Regulatory Framework", 2008, 90 pp. [Lien]

  • Report "Disclosure in Criminal Proceedings", 2008, 27 pp. [Lien]

  • Review Paper "The Criminal Justice System and the Constitutional Rights of an Accused Person", 2008, 97 pp. [Lien]

  • Report "Access to Justice & Limitation of Actions against Public Officers and the State", 2008, 26 pp. [Lien]

  • Issue Paper "Disclosure in Criminal Proceedings", 2007, 28 pp. [Lien]

  • Discussion Paper "Law and Practice relating to Criminal Investigation, Arrest and Bail", 2007, 128 pp. [Lien]

  • Report "Opening Mauritius to International Law Firms and Formation of Law Firms/Corporations", 2007, 46 pp. [Lien]

  • Issue Paper "Commentary on the Human Rights Dimension of the Sexual Offences Bill No VI of 2007", 2007, 23 pp. [Lien]

  • Report "Relationship of Children with Grand Parents and other Persons under the Code Civil Mauricien", 2007, 11 pp. [Lien]

  • Discussion Paper "Access to Justice and Limitation of Actions against Public Officers and the State", 2007, 20 pp. [Lien]

  • C. KENYON, Mauritius : Law of Criminal Procedure. A Country Study Prepared for the Department of the Navy, 1983

  • S. AUMEERUDDY-CZIFFRA, The Legal Status of Woman and Family Welfare in Mauritius, International Planned Parenthood Federation, 1978, 16 pp.

  • L. VALLET, Working of Abortion Law in Mauritius, International Planned Parenthood Federation, 1978

  • Mahatma Gandhi Institute, The Development of Local Government in Mauritius, 1982, 39 pp.

  • Draebel, ‘Evaluation des besoins sociaux de la communauté déplacée de l’Archipel de Chagos’, December 1997, Report produced for the World Health Organization

  • Rapport Prosser : Resettlement of persons from chagos archipelago, 1976

Compendiums of Statutory Law

  • La Constitution de la République de Maurice : en versions anglaise et française avec un répertoire par article de la jurisprudence en matière constitutionnelle, av.-prop. L. Favoreu, Best Graphics, 1993, 292 pp.

  • Revised Laws of Mauritius

  • D. NAPAL, Les constitutions de l’Ile Maurice, Mauritius Archives Publications, 1962, 150 pp.

  • L. VENCHARD, Codes annotés de l’île Maurice, Best Graphics

  • t. 1 : Code civil, 1ère éd. 1983 et 2e éd. 1996

  • t. 2 : Code pénal, 1994

  • vol. 1 : Lois annotées, tables

  • vol. 2 : La jurisprudence 1900 MR 75 to 1981 MR 257

  • vol. 3 : La jurisprudence 1981 MR 267 to Privy Council Appeal 55 of 1992

  • t. 3 : Code de commerce et code de procédure civile, 1998, 656 pp.

  • L. VENCHARD/A. ANGELO, Labour Laws of Mauritius, Best Graphics, 1ère éd. 1983, 2e éd. 1988, 3e éd. 1992, 857 pp.

  • Code civil mauricien, Temple Law Books/LexisNexis, 2012

Case law digests

  • R. BRUZAUD, Recueil de décisions judiciaires de l’île Maurice 1842-1845, 1845, 198 pp.

  • R. BRUZAUD, Revue judiciaire de l’île Maurice, 1843-1844 (24 numéros parus)

  • Mauritius Reports, LexisNexis, 1861-

  • A Digest of the Reported Decisions of the Supreme Court of Mauritius (“Mauritius Digest”)

  • W. GREENE, A Digest of Reported Criminal Jurisprudence from 1842 to 1883, Mercantile Record Company’s Printing Establishment, 1884, 240 pp.

  • L. A. HUGUES, A Digest from 1861 to 1901, The Central Printing Establishment, 1905, 456 pp.

  • NAIRAC, A Digest, PG Burnstead, 1927

  • G. LALOUETTE, A Digest to the End of 1950, 4 vol., 1957

  • G. LALOUETTE, A Supplement (1951-1955) to the Mauritius Digest, 1957

  • G. LALOUETTE, A Second Supplement (1956-1960) to the Mauritius Digest, 1961

  • V. GLOVER, Abstract of Decisions of the Supreme Court of Mauritius, Precisgraph

  • 1966-1981, 1982

  • 1982-1986, 1993

  • R. STEVEN, A Magistrate’s Court in Action: Selected Judgements 1994-1997, 1998, 128 pp.

  • U. BOOLELL, Compendium of Case Law in Mauritius, 1994, 2 vol.

  • R. DOOKHY/P. DOOKHY, Mauritius Privy Council Reports [Lien]

  • vol. 1 : 1968-1992 Judgments, The Thames Chambers International, 1999

  • R. D’UNIENVILLE, Nomenclature des décisions de la Cour suprême de l’île Maurice relatives aux codes civil, de procédure civile et de commerce, Mauritius Printing

  • 1861-1963, 1964, 136 pp.

  • Supplément 1964-1973, 1976, 26 pp.

  • L. VENCHARD/V. GLOVER/A. ANGELO, New Mauritius Digest, Best Graphics, 1999

  • V. GLOVER/T. ANGELO, Laws of Mauritius, Best Graphics, 2001, 7 vol.

  • D. POTAYA, Guide to Decisions of the Supreme Court of Mauritius affecting Banking (1861-2007)

Library Catalogues

249http://www.africabib.org/afbib.php

250http://library.uom.ac.mu

Quelques mots à propos de :  Shivani GEORGIJEVIC

Lecturer, Faculty of Law and Management, University of Mauritius, REPUBLIC OF MAURITIUS